JEDI Masters and what it means for mpro5 clients

Our partner, Microsoft, has won the contract to provide the US Government with US$10bn of Cloud Services. The good people at cloudpro.co.uk reported that Microsoft had beaten off competition from all of the big players in cloud.

“The contract, known as the Joint Enterprise Defence Infrastructure (JEDI), pitted some of the world’s biggest tech companies against each other with the ultimate prize being to upgrade the US defence department’s IT systems.

As winners of the contract, Microsoft will provide AI-based analysis and store classified military information, as well as a host of other computer services. A big reason for the project is to give the military better access to data and the cloud from battlefields, which also proved to be to big a concern.”

Now, how does this relate to mpro5? Well, we have been pioneers of the Microsoft Cloud, switching to Azure before people knew it was anything other than a shade of blue. When we first tried Azure, there was no data center in Europe save for Ireland and The Netherlands. We perceived the main benefits were:-

Uptime
Backup
Mirroring
Value

Service
Adaptability
Global footprint

Recognize any of those benefits with mpro5 ? I do and I personally believe that Microsoft are seriously underestimated as a driver of innovation. Crimson Tide tries to match their ambition. Congratulations to our partner.

Security in the cloud

For many years I have said that the major cloud providers’ cloud environments are “probably” more secure than a private network. Seems that others now think the same , unless you are using a multi-cloud environment. At mpro5, we use Azure exclusively and the article at cloudpro here suggests that our single provider strategy is the right one.

The argument for private networks usually revolves around control. Examples of password security, back up and controlled access are often brought up. However it is what is usually missed in this argument that makes on-premise deployments of software slightly more scary to my mind.

On site I’d like people to think of things such as:-

Have you ever restored a back up?

What happens in the event of a fire – it’s OK having a backup, but where is the server?

Have you ever actually tried your off premise solution (connectivity, access, building security)?

Of course, the folks at Microsoft have a very rounded cloud security policy. It’s quite long, but you can see it here. I like to think we can rely on Dell, The City of Barcelona and The Seattle Seahawks to make the right decisions. We rely on Azure and, as Microsoft Gold Partners for over 10 years, we understand how to use it properly and…..securely.